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Demolition Program

DeKalb County Beautification Unit

* CODE ENFORCEMENT * KEEP DEKALB BEAUTIFUL * ROADSIDE ENHANCEMENT* *CLEAN COMMUNITIES CREW *FORECLOSURE AND VACANT REGISTRY*

Demolition Program

The purpose of the complaint In-Rem process is to develop a more efficient way to address blighted properties in unincorporated DeKalb County.  The Department of Planning and Sustainability’s Code Compliance- Neighborhood Stabilization Division determined that there was a significant need to revise the way blighted properties in DeKalb County were being processed.  An In-Rem officer was appointed to oversee this newly created efficiency plan; thus, a newly devised Complaint In-Rem process was created.

What is In-Rem?

Complaint In-Rem is a process administrated by the Code Enforcement Unit to address blighted and vacant properties in unincorporated DeKalb County.

demolition.jpgExpected Outcomes

  • To provide an enhanced customer service process.
  • This process would lead the efforts in monitoring, processing, and facilitating the demolition of In-Rem properties in unincorporated DeKalb County.

 

Complaint In-Rem Process

  • A complaint folder is created containing code notices and citations against the property, in-rem form, a list of any improvements made and supporting documents.
  • A statement is written containing the action sought by the county to abate or correct the alleged violation and the estimated cost of the corrective action.
  • The officer ensures that proper paperwork is available for the legal process.   During this time, the court may assess fines, order owners to repair, close, demolish, or board up the structure to minimum specifications. The court may also order the county to repair, close, or demolish dangerous structure at the public’s expense.  The full costs of which shall constitute a lien against the property.

For questions about the abatement program, contact Senior Officer Jordan at djordan@dekalbcountyga.gov or by phone at 404.687.3958.

Abatement Program

DeKalb County Beautification Unit
Code Enforcement * Keep DeKalb Beautiful * Roadside Enhancement

 

Abatement Program

The purpose of an Abatement Program is to develop an efficient way to address abandoned or occupied properties in unincorporated DeKalb County that have been left to deteriorate and become eyesores in the community.

What is abatement?

The definition of abatement refers to the process of something ending or becoming less than it was at a prior time. The suppression or termination of a nuisance. The abatement program includes a process administrated by the Code Enforcement Unit to address blighted properties within unincorporated DeKalb County. 

Expected Outcomes

  • To provide an enhanced customer service process.
  • This process would lead the efforts in monitoring, processing, and facilitating the abatement of blighted properties within unincorporated DeKalb County.

Abatement Process

  • A complaint folder is created containing any code notices and citations against the property, a list of any improvements made and supporting documents.
  • A statement is written containing the action sought by the county to abate or correct the alleged violation and the estimated cost of the corrective action.
  • The officer ensures that proper paperwork is available for the legal process.   During this time, the court may assess fines, order owners to abate the property to minimum specifications. The court may also order the County to abate the property at the public’s expense.  The full costs of which shall constitute a lien against the property.
     

For questions about the abatement program, contact Senior Officer Jordan via email at djordan@dekalbcountyga.gov or via phone at 404.687.3958.

 

Gallery

GALLERY

         

KDB TV

 

Featured Groups and Individuals
 

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KDB Director Gordon Burkette presenting the 3rd Annual Cynthia Houston Award to Ken Taylor

Rain Barrel Workshops

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Mason Mill Park- June 2017

 

Barriers To Beauty

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Tucker Recreation Center- June 2017
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Lucious Sanders Recrecation Center- April 2017

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Montessori at Emory School- March 2017

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Neighborhood Summit- June 2016

 

Community Clean-Ups

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Scottdale Community  

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             4US Organization                                                     Chapel Run

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            Gresham Hills Neighborhood                                                  Wesley Chapel                      
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Columbia High School                                         Commissioner Johnson District 3 

 

KDB IN THE NEWS

9/14/17: DeKalb County Hosts Rain Barrel Workshop in Brookhaven
9/7/17: DeKalb Court Launches Initiative to Clean Up Blight in County
6/27/17: DeKalb to host South River Cleanup
6/7/17:    DeKalb to host Community Clean-Up this Saturday
6/6/17:   Rain Barrel Workshop being hosted by Keep DeKalb Beautiful
5/19/17: DeKalb County's Operation Clean Sweep removes 200 tons of debris
4/28/17: Spring Valley embraces challenge of keeping Columbia Drive beautiful
4/27/17: Art Fights Blight in DeKalb Neighborhoods
4/21/17: Barriers To Beauty: Thwarting Illegal Dumping With Art
4/14/17: Business, Illegal Dumpers Warned About County Codes
4/5/17:   Operation Clean Sweep Tops 100 Tons
3/15/17: Operation Clean Sweep Removes 50 Tons Of Debris
1/19/17: Mobile Apps Are Helping To Keep DeKalb Beautiful

Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP)

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NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP), NSP1 was authorized by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA), which provided $3.92 billion in financing to state and local governments on a formula basis that factored percentages of home foreclosures, homes financed by subprime mortgages, and delinquencies.  NSP2 was authorized under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and provided grants to states, local governments, nonprofits and other entities on a competitive basis.  The final round, NSP3, was authorized in 2010 under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and provided $1billion to state and local governments under the same funding formula as NSP1.

DeKalb County received a total of $23.7 million in NSP funding -$18.5 million in NSP1 and $5.2 million in NSP3. Georgia did not receive funding under NSP3.

The specific purpose of the program was to provide emergency assistance to state and local governments to acquire and redevelop abandoned or foreclosed properties that might otherwise become sources of abandonment and blight within their communities and sell these properties to eligible borrowers.

Eligible Activities

NSP funds can only be used for the following activities:

  • Purchase and rehabilitate foreclosed properties in order to sell, rent, or redevelop such homes and properties.
  • Demolish blighted structures.
  • Redevelop demolished or vacant property.
  • Establish or enhance the capacity of land to assist in property redevelopment efforts
  • Establish funding mechanisms for the purchase and redevelopment of foreclosed homes including soft-seconds, loan loss reserves, and shared equity loans for low-and-moderate-income home buyers.      

CURRENT NSP1
January 1 - March 31, 2018​ Performance Report
July 1 - Sept. 30, 2017 Performance Report
Apr. 1 - June 30, 2017 Performance Report
Jan. 1 - Mar. 31, 2017 Performance Report

CURRENT NSP3
January 1 - March 31, 2018 Performance Report

July 1 - Sept. 30, 2017 Performance Report
Apr. 1 - June 30, 2017 Performance Report
Jan. 1 - Mar. 31, 2017 Performance Report

 

Click the image below to download the latest DeKalb County NSP Program study that reveals how the Program has increased home values
and improved quality of life
in the County.

NSP Report

 


 

 

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Foreclosure/Vacant Property Registry

DeKalb County Vacant & Foreclosure Registry

The DeKalb County Foreclosure Registry and the Vacant Property Registry were established as a means to protect neighborhoods from becoming blighted through the lack of adequate maintenance and security of properties that are vacant.

Improperly maintained and unsecure vacant properties can become a hazard to the health and safety of anyone who may come on or near the property and can adversely affect the aesthetic and economic attributes of communities.  Difficulties often arise in locating the person responsible for maintenance of foreclosed properties. DeKalb County finds that there is a substantial need directly related to the public health, safety and welfare to comprehensively address these concerns through the adoption of the Foreclosure Registry Ordinance as well as the Vacant Property Registry Ordinance.

Foreclosure Sign

Owners of foreclosed properties are required to:

  • Register the property with DeKalb County within 120 days of foreclosure
  • Designate a local property agent
  • Report any changes in contact information
  • Pay a fee of $100
  • Failure to comply with the Ordinance will result in fines of up to $1,000 per violation

Owners of vacant properties are required to:Home

  • Register the property with DeKalb County within 90 days of vacancy
  • Designate a local property agent
  • Report any changes in contact information
  • Pay a fee of $100
  • Failure to comply with the Ordinance will result in fines of up to $1,000 per violation

 

 

Owners of properties that are both vacant and foreclosed are required to register the property with both the vacant and foreclosure registry.

               

 

To register a foreclosed or vacant property click here

Beautification Projects

 

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Beautification projects in DeKalb County are aimed at helping citizens dramatically improve their neighborhood's environment and aesthetics. Well maintained, clean communities discourage littering, illegal dumping, and crime. Clean communities also contribute to the overall health of our environment, increase property values and attract new businesses to the neighborhood.

 

The following is a list of Keep DeKalb Beautiful's Beautification Projects, Workshops and Events in recent years:

2017
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Barriers to Beautification

Heart of South DeKalb Festival
Tucker Recreation Center
Lucious Sanders Recreation Center
Montessori at Emory School
Greater Towers Spring Community Festival
DeKalb County Safety Day
Berean Christian Church
Juvenile Court-Memorial Drive @ Kensington

Rain Barrel Workshop

Mason Mill Park
Brookrun Park
City of Brookhaven
Arabia Mountain Park
Scottdale Community Center

Operation Clean Sweep Board-Up Program

Tulip Drive, Decatur, GA
Northview Avenue, Decatur, GA
Longleaf Drive, Decatur, GA

Glendale Court Beautification 
Columbia High School Beautification
Wadsworth Elementary Planting
Brookside Park Beautification
Old McDonough Road Closure

Hazardous Household Waste Event

 

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How to Beautify Your Neighborhood

Organize Neighborhood Clean-Ups 
Implement Public Art

Plant Flowers and Trees
Remove Graffiti Vandalism
Start a Community Garden
Report Blight to the Code Enforcement Department
Recycle

How KDB Can Help You

We Provide: 

Landscaping Project Materials Free of Charge including Trees, Compost, and Mulch (subject to availability)
Tools and Information to Respond to Graffiti Vandalism
Access to Tree and Plant Specialists
Publicity and Acknowledgment for your Group's Efforts

 

Please contact us if you would like to volunteer or need assistance with a beautification project in your neighborhood.
 

CEO Michael L. Thurmond

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Michael L. Thurmond won a 2016 landslide victory to become chief executive officer of DeKalb County, one of the most diverse counties in the Southeast. Since his Jan. 1, 2017 swearing-in, Thurmond’s primary mission is restoring trust in county government.  His other priorities include adopting a balanced budget, ensuring accurate water bills, removing blight, offering summer youth employment, improving employee compensation, and fulfilling the federal/state sewer consent agreement.

Thurmond, a former member of the Georgia General Assembly and the first African-American elected to a statewide office without prior appointment, is widely regarded as a “turnaround expert” after fundamentally transforming the culture and enhancing operations of complex organizations such as the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services, the Georgia Department of Labor and the DeKalb County School District.  

As superintendent of DeKalb schools, Thurmond is credited with stabilizing the system during a governance crisis, upgrading its threatened accreditation, eliminating a multimillion-dollar deficit and improving student academic performance and graduation rates.

Thurmond was raised as a sharecropper's son in Clarke County, Georgia. He graduated with honors with a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy and religion from Paine College and later earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of South Carolina’s School of Law. He also completed the Political Executives program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

In 1986, he became the first African-American elected to the Georgia General Assembly from Clarke County since Reconstruction. During his legislative tenure, Thurmond authored major legislation that provided more than $250 million in tax relief to Georgia's senior citizens and working families.

Thurmond received a gubernatorial appointment to lead the state Division of Family and Children Services and direct Georgia's historic transition from welfare to work. He created the innovative Work First program, which helped more than 90,000 welfare-dependent Georgia families move from dependence into the workforce.

In 1997, Thurmond became a distinguished lecturer at the University of Georgia's Carl Vinson Institute of Government. The following year, he was elected Georgia labor commissioner.

During his three terms as labor commissioner, Thurmond’s most significant achievement was the construction of a $20 million school for children with disabilities at the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute.

Thurmond’s latest book, Freedom: Georgia’s Antislavery Heritage, 1733-1865, was awarded the Georgia Historical Society’s Lilla Hawes Ward.  In 2004, The Georgia Center for the Book listed Freedom as one of The 25 Books All Georgian’s Should Read. He serves on the University of Georgia Libraries Board of Visitors.  He is married to Zola Fletcher Thurmond, and they have one daughter, Mikaya.

Download CEO Michael Thurmond's Biography (PDF)

Download CEO Michael Thurmond's Photo (JPG, right-click and select Save Image As...)

 

Please find the 2018 State of the County Day Address below.

                      

Please find the 2018 State of the County Evening Address below.

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