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Incursion Article 2

Using a Runway as a Taxiway!
-- a word from PDK's Airport Director, Lee Remmel

Plane ImageAIM Chapter 4 (ATC Clearances/Separations), Section 3 (Airport Operations), paragraph 4-3-18 (Taxiing) states "a clearance must be obtained prior to going on a runway, taking off, or landing during the hours an Air Traffic Control Tower is in operation".

Incursion Article

Excerpts from "Close Encounters" by Jay Hopkins, Flying magazine, Mar, 2001

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"Even if the increase (in reported runway incursions) is due to better reporting and record keeping, that does not alter the fact that we face a serious problem, and all the current attention has not significantly reduced the number of incursions and near-collisions."

Incursion 4

Runway Incursion Hazard Area - 4

When landing to the south on Runway 20L, pilots are sometimes directed by ATC to sidestep to the parallel runway, Runway 20R. During this procedure, pilots risk the chance of confusing Taxiway Alpha with Runway 20R, because Runway 20R threshold is about 2,000 feet beyond Runway 20L's pavement edge. Taxiway Alpha is the same length as 20L and is constructed of concrete similar in color to Runway 20L, but contrasting in color to the asphalt of Runway 20R.

Incursion

Runway Incursion Action Page

At PDK, we are dedicated to reducing runway incursions. The following information is presented for users of the airport to gain additional understanding of the factors that cause incursions.

Incursion 1

Runway Incursion Hazard Area - 1

The intersection of taxiway Hotel and runway 16-34 is a high risk area for runway incursion by pedestrians and automobiles Incursions have occurred here in past from vehicles and people trying to reach Signature FBO from the west side of the airport via Hotel. Signage has been installed in this area to alert pedestrian and vehicles that an active runway is ahead.

mauler

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The Navy AM-1 Mauler pictured here with PDK's NAS Atlanta insignia is preserved at the National Museum of Naval Aviation History in Pensacola, FL. In April, 1949, Martin Corporation test pilot O.E. "Pat" Tibbs flew this Mauler to set an unofficial weight lifting record of 10,648 pounds. This included three 2,200-pound torpedoes, twelve 250-pound bombs, and 800 rounds of ammunition for the four wing-mounted 20mm cannons.
 

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